May 31, 2012

40th SCGS Summer Genealogy Workshop

40th SCGS Summer Genealogy Workshop

Friday, July 13 9:00a.m. to 8:00p.m. at South Carolina Archives and History Center, Columbia, SC
 
Internationally known genealogist Tony Burroughs and immediate past president of the National Genealogical Society, Jan Alpert, will present the latest research methods and information sources in fast-changing the field of genealogy.

The two-day event also will feature many other speakers, both national and state, who will provide attendees with the tools needed to successfully trace families.

May 30, 2012

Why it Pays to Follow and Post on Genealogy Forums

My new sister-in-law never knew her grandmother. All she knew was a first name - Mabel. Mabel had a son (the father of my sister-in-law) who she gave up for adoption in 1914 and all the family knew was that she worked for a wealthy family in London England.

As a surprise for my sister-in-law I've been researching her family for the past year. I started with her dad's birth certificate from PRO, which didn't reveal his father's name but gave me more information about Mabel.

Using that plus a marriage record, I was able to trace Mabel and her family back several generations. But all I could find on Mabel was that she never married and died in 1977.

So I began tracing Mabel's siblings - one brother and one sister. The sister died young but her brother married, had one son and that son had four children. I told my sister-in-law that if she wanted I would try to find and contact the four children (they would be her cousins) but she should be prepared for reactions ranging from overjoyed to know of new family to refusal to acknowledge her.

Long story short, I follow various genealogy forums online. In order to know when new posts are made to certain forums, I make sure I post responses to others queries. That way I get an email when anyone posts on that topic. I also post queries.

Two days ago I received an email notification that a man had posted in a forum I watch where the topic is Mabel's surname.

I was blown away by this new post. Someone had posted looking for information on his grandfather - Mable's brother! I wrote to him privately and told him about Mabel and her son. I wasn't sure if he would respond or if the family knew about Mabel's son. But I got lucky. He responded with "this is a bombshell but I'm overjoyed"

In an exchange of emails I have learned that he knew his "Aunt Mabel" very well and that he visited her frequently until her death. He's now filled me in on many details of Mabel's life and personality. She was well-loved by her family but no one alive now knew of her son.

Ironically she lived less than 11 miles from her son when he was an adult. It is so sad that he never got to meet her but my sister-in-law is thrilled to find out about her mysterious grandmother.

Best of all, my new contact is in the process of asking his mother for photos of Mabel.

Had I not been watching this particular surname forum it's unlikely I'd have found Mable's nephew. Serendipity at work!

May 29, 2012

Queen Victoria's Journals Online

In celebration of her Diamond Jubilee, and of Queen Victoria's birthday on 24 May, Queen Elizabeth II has made the journals of Queen Victoria available to the public.

The journals provide a picture of Queen Victoria's life from the first entry in 1832 at the age of 13 until 10 days before her death aged 81 in 1901.

Digital images of every page in Queen Victoria's diaries are available at Queen Victoria's Journals . Full transcriptions and keyword searching of the journal entries cover the period from Queen Victoria's first diary entry in July 1832 to her marriage to Prince Albert in February 1840

This is an ongoing project and journal entries will continue to be transcribed.

May 28, 2012

Boy Finds Photo of Long Dead Uncle in Garage Sale Camera

This is such an odd story that I felt compelled to share it. A 13 year old boy bought a camera at a garage sale. He got it home and opened it to find a photo of his uncle who'd been killed several years before.

The family who owned the camera have no known connection to the boy or his uncle. 

Read the complete details of this strange tale of serendipity in Wichita Kansas

May 27, 2012

Sharing Memories (Week 22): The Bread Box

This Week 22 of our 52 weeks of Sharing Memories - A Genealogy Journey for 2012. This is our third year writing our memoirs and childhood memories for our descendants.

If you are just joining us, you can take a peek at the last two years' of prompts by clicking on the Sharing Memories tab at the top of the blog. You can jump in at any time and you can skip topics that you don't like. There are no rules, it's all about getting your memories down on paper. The prompts are here as a guide to help if you are stuck for ideas.

Share your memories here in the comment section, on your own blog, or privately in a journal you keep at home. The important thing is to write.

Last week I thought about our Bread Box. Sounds like a silly memory doesn't it? I don't know why it popped into my head. You rarely see them anymore so maybe 100 years from now my descendants won't even know what one is.

My mom had a bread box on the kitchen counter - the kind with the flip up front. It was made out of some cheap metal, maybe tin?

When i was first married, I had a breadbox too. Old habits die hard I guess! But the bread didn't last long, it would often go moldy before the loaf was finished.

Funny how that went out of style at some point. Now I store my bread in the refrigerator. It dries out but it lasts longer. Kind of a Catch-22 situation. 


May 26, 2012

A Genealogist's Birthday Card

 Okay maybe it's just me but I think this is the cutest card ever!

It might be a bit young for my son who has a 30-something birthday coming up very soon, but I liked it enough to buy it anyway.

Sure hope he isn't reading my Olive Tree Genealogy blog today.....

I wish there were more genealogy themed cards available. I realize I could make one myself but I like store-bought ones.

And I like ones I can send and get via mail the old-fashioned way, not a digital card.

I'm not fussy, I just know what I like! I prefer a card I can save.  And I save far too many! I have many dozens in my Genealogy Treasures Blanket Box.

How about you? Are you totally into digital? Or do you like the look and feel of one you get in the mail?



May 25, 2012

Brewster Collection Added to NYGB eLibrary

The following announcement was received by Olive Tree Genealogy from The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society

Brewster Collection Added to NYG&B eLibrary 


ebrewster
Emma Brewster Jones
Our digital library now includes all 27 portions of the Brewster Collection donated by Miss Emma C. Brewster Jones in 1908. This genealogical material on the descendants of Elder William Brewster, passenger on the Mayflower, contains extensive material on lines of descent through female Brewster family members.

The new material in the digital library is particularly exciting as it contains material on the female lines; none of this was included in her two-volume Brewster Genealogy published in 1907. Surnames listed include: Bartlett, Christophers, Coolidge, Freeman, Fosdick, Knowles, Mayo, Paine, Pickett, Prence, Prince, Starr, Turner, and Wetherell.

Members will be interested to know that the NYG&B acquired the Brewster Collection almost 100 years ago, and a description was published in The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, (Vol. 044, No.3).

Click here for a complete breakdown of the volumes and chapters within this collection.    

May 24, 2012

A Tip for Using Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner (and a Coupon!)

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner came to my rescue once again. Such a simple thing but it saved me some time and trouble. I'd promised my daughter a copy of one 8 1/2x11 sheet of paper. That doesn't sound like a big deal but the sheet is colored and I needed the copy to retain the original colors. I couldn't photocopy it and mail to her because I don't have a color copier.

I could have gone up to Staples and paid to have it copied but that's a 20 minute drive each way and with the cost of gas plus my time spent doing this, it seemed like there had to be a better way. Not that my daughter isn't worth it, she is!! But I wanted to get the copy to her quickly, and I was laid up with my bad hip. So the drive was out of the question.

My main computer is not hooked up since I'm in process of moving to my new office space, so that means no big scanner hooked up either.  I could have used my iPhone camera but the page was mostly text and that always seems a little blurry to me on a camera picture.

Then I remembered my Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner! All I had to do was make two quick scans (one for each section of the page I needed) Then insert the memory card into the USB adapter, pop it into my MacBookAir and within seconds I had both scans ready to email to my daughter. I didn't bother with the stitching abiiity because that wasn't necessary but I could have done that quickly too.

So that's my new tip for using your Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner. Don't have a Flip-Pal? No worries, here's two May coupons for you to choose from if you want to purchase one.

May Flora

May 22 – May 31 Use Promotion Code: gc512a

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and receive a grey Flip-Pal Carry Case FREE! (Please note: this is the neoprene, not deluxe carry case. Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

May Fauna

May 22 – May 31 Use Promotion Code: dcs512a

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Digital Creativity Suite 3.0 DVD and get a Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit FREE! (Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

May 23, 2012

Six States Indexed for 1940 US Census on FamilySearch

The following announcement was received by Olive Tree Genealogy from FamilySearch

1940 U.S. Census Community Project Nearly Halfway Complete



22 May 2012


The halfway point for indexing the 1940 U.S. census is fast approaching. 
 
Congratulations and thank you to all of the volunteers participating in this unprecedented genealogical community effort. Currently more than 20 states are at or above 85 percent complete. Six states—Delaware, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon, Virginia, and New Hampshire—are now indexed and searchable by name, location, and family relations. And thanks to the efforts of more than 100,000 volunteers, more states will be added in the coming weeks. Follow the day-to-day indexing status at the1940census.com dashboard and search completed states at familysearch.org/1940census.
 
Current and Completed Projects
To view a list of currently available indexing projects, along with their record language and completion percentage, visit the FamilySearch indexing updates page. To learn more about individual projects, view the FamilySearch projects page.
 
View the FamilySearch projects page to see the full list of available projects and to learn more about how to participate in various projects.
 

May 22, 2012

From Record to Reality - Gleaning Your Family's Story of Service

Olive Tree Genealogy is very pleased to present an article by Guest Author Marie Rundquist. Marie's books (listed at end of article) are available at  buybooksontheweb.com (Infinity Publishing), Barnes and Noble, along with other Internet and E-book sources. 

From Record to Reality
Gleaning Your Family's Story of Service
by Marie Rundquist
May 2012

At Memorial Day events and backyard barbecues, we cherish the memories of our beloved men and women in uniform, share their treasured photographs, and display their medals of honor, but what do we really know of their stories?  As time passes, and wartime memories fade, an ancestor's military registration record, limited to the most basic of vital information, may be the only evidence of his service to his country.  While genealogists highlight marriages, births, and family lines in their research, military service is often incidental -- a footnote annotation in a charted family tree.  When I initially researched my own family history, I found elaborate details related to my ancestors' marriages, births, and deaths, but noted only a cursory mention of their military careers.  


At a recent memorial service for my husband's paternal uncle, we had the opportunity to witness the presentation of an American flag by an Honor Guard, a stunning tribute to my husband's “Uncle Ed” and his service to his country.  At Ed's viewing, there were many stories shared about his love of family, his devotion to his real-estate career, his ability to organize community events, and put people at ease, but little was said about his military service.  As he was laid to rest, and an American flag, folded into the shape of a three-cornered hat, was presented by the Honor Guard to surviving family, all in attendance were at once reminded that Ed had enlisted in the the military during World War II, and were deeply moved.


Ed's World War II enlistment record offers an abbreviated view of a high school graduate with machine-shop training, a single man with dependents, who were his immediate family. Challenged to complete Ed's story of service, I searched the 1930 Federal Census records and discovered that Ed was, in fact, the youngest in a family of eight, that his mother and father were originally from Poland.  I examined the census reports of adjacent households in Trenton, New Jersey's sixth ward, observed numbers of Czechoslovakian and Polish surnames in close proximity, and concluded that Ed lived in a tightly-knit, Eastern European immigrant community.  I browsed the recently published 1940 Federal Census and unearthed the roots of Ed's (and my husband's) deeply ingrained work-ethic, for according to the enumerator, Ed's three elder brothers all contributed to the household, and each held a job – as, respectively, a night-club musician, a factory-worker, and my father-in-law was, at the time of the1940 Federal Census, an apprentice linoleum layer for a department store.  According to the census taker, Polish was the language most commonly spoken at home in Ed's neighborhood..  


A 1941 parish directory was shared at Ed's memorial service, its pages lined with the photographs of young men in uniform, their faces full of hope, eyes bright and shining.  Leafing through the directory, I was reminded that while most view senior year as a launching point for college and careers, for a high school graduating class in the early 1940s, senior year was a weigh-station on a long and perilous journey – one that for many would end on foreign shores.  From a published obituary, I learned that Ed was an Air Force veteran of World War II, who served in the Asiatic Pacific campaign.  After returning home, Ed approached life with boundless optimism  -- that he, as a survivor of World War II,  had the opportunity to marry, buy a home, build a career, educate his children, and be of help to  his family and friends ranked highest among his concerns. A lover of music and song, and a devoted family man, Ed didn't “sweat the small stuff.”  Quibbling over trivial and insignificant events of the day simply didn't factor into Ed's priorities – nor did quibbling factor into his brother's priorities, as I recall, and certainly my husband is not a quibbler..


By extending my research beyond a single military registration record, to include the 1930 and 1940 Federal Census, newspaper articles, and other published sources, I gained insight into a family's shared traits, uncovered the greater reality that upheld “Uncle Ed's” military enlistment record, and, in honor of Memorial Day, advanced one enlisted man's story of service from footnote to front-and-center.



Marie Rundquist is a DNA project manager, collaborative research community moderator, president of an information systems consulting firm and author of Revisiting Anne Marie: How an Amerindian Woman of Seventeenth-Century Nova Scotia and a DNA Match Redefine “American” Heritage and Cajun by Any Other Name Recovering the Lost History of a Family and a People. For more information visit: http://dna-genealogy-history.com

May 21, 2012

Turn a Genealogy Guess Into a Working Theory

Davida asked Olive Tree Genealogy an interesting question and one that I think is asked by many newcomers to genealogy. Here's her question:

In the 1870 census, I found 14 males with the name Blake in St Peters, Beaufort, SC.  My question is could it be that these males were related. I realize that it's kind of hard to tell just from census records but being that there are such few of them, I thought that maybe the older men were possibly brothers who had sons and those sons had sons.
Davida - you've come up with a good guess for those fourteen Blake males.  They could indeed be related. But it's only a guess. You have no evidence to support your guess. And there are other possibilities:

* The older men could be cousins.
* The men could be from unrelated Blake families.
* They could be related but much further back than brothers or first cousins.

LIST THE POSSIBILITIES

Adding your guess to the mix we see that we have four good possibilities. So let's simplify it.

1. the men are related in some way or
2. the men are not related

FIND THE EVIDENCE

Your job as a genealogist is to find evidence that supports your guess (older men are brothers) or disproves it.  

You can start by listing the family groups you know from the 1870 census. Then search 1860 and 1850 census records to see if you can fit more of the men into proven families.

Look for other records that will help you straighten out those Blake males. Church records for baptisms, marriages or deaths. Obituaries in newspapers.  These are only a few of the record sources you should try next.

NEVER ASSUME

The most important piece of advice I can give is to NOT make assumptions! Create working theories if you like, such as your guess that the older men could be brothers. That can be your working theory. But don't assume it's correct. Work to prove or disprove it. If it turns out to be correct, pat yourself on the back and continue on. If it turns out to be wrong, form a new working theory and go from there.

It's okay to guess. It's okay to form a theory. But after you've formulated a guess or theory, you have to look for evidence that supports it. Because good Genealogy is based on facts and evidence, not guesses or unproven theories.


May 20, 2012

Sharing Memories (Week 21): Surgeries

This Week 21 of our 52 weeks of Sharing Memories - A Genealogy Journey for 2012. This is our third year writing our memoirs and childhood memories for our descendants.

If you are just joining us, you can take a peek at the last two years' of prompts by clicking on the Sharing Memories tab at the top of the blog. You can jump in at any time and you can skip topics that you don't like. There are no rules, it's all about getting your memories down on paper. The prompts are here as a guide to help if you are stuck for ideas.

Share your memories here in the comment section, on your own blog, or privately in a journal you keep at home. The important thing is to write.

When I was 16 years old I had my knee operated on. That was the first of many operations on that knee and I'm scheduled for two more. I'd had pain in that knee for years but my mom kept telling me it was "just growing pains." Does anyone else know that overused expression?

Well it wasn't growing pains. As young as I was when I first recall the pain (age 11), I didn't think growing pains should hurt that much! My knee use to lock into place and I would be unable to move. Literally. I'd be walking to school and bam! Excrutiating pain and locked into place. I'd have to wiggle and jiggle and shake my leg, crying the whole time, until it released enough to allow some movement. My mom continued to claim growing pains as the culprit. Finally at age 16 I took matters into my own hands and made a doctor's appointment on my own. Before I knew it I was at a specialist and then whisked into hospital for surgery.

Then came the fun of being on crutches and only going to school part-time. Because we had no school buses and I couldn't walk the few miles to our High School, it was arranged that I'd be transported by taxi. I only had to attend half-days and I remember I would come home exhausted.

It took a lot of physiotherapy to get back to any semblance of easier movement and walking but the time passed and I did it.

What major surgeries or health problems did you experience as a child? Or were you lucky enough to get through relatively unscathed? I was always a sickly kid and my knee problems were just the tip of the iceberg.

May 19, 2012

FREE International Immigration Records on Ancestry.ca this Weekend

This Victoria Day Weekend Ancestry.ca is offering 200 million historical immigration records from around the world for free, until May 21st.

Immigration and travel records tell the story of your ancestors as they made the courageous decision to immigrate, travel or become a citizen of a new country. With 200 million immigration records from Canada, United Kingdom, the U.S. and several other countries from around the world at your disposal, you may uncover the answers you’ve been looking for. Explore passenger lists, naturalization records, border crossings, crew lists, immigration and emigration books, passports and more as you discover your family’s journey to Canada.

The story of your ancestors’ journey to a new country is waiting to be uncovered. Search Ancestry.ca international immigration records for free, this Victoria Day Weekend only until May 21st.

May 18, 2012

Press Release: More States Indexed for 1940 US Census

The following announcement was received by Olive Tree Genealogy 

From Archives.com

We are happy to announce that the 1940 census name index for three more states - Florida, Utah, and Wyoming - are now available for free at Archives.com . (Archives members can also search these records in the Member area.)

These states join Colorado, Delaware, Kansas, New Hampshire, Oregon, and Virginia as part of the quickly-growing 1940 census index.

May 17, 2012

The Frustration Over Online Family Trees Gone Bad

The Frustration Over Online Family Trees Gone Bad
This morning on my personal Facebook page I posted a rant for my status update. I ranted about online family trees that were rife with huge errors. Errors that included linking a census record for a man aged 29 to a man of the same name who was over 70. And yes, the owner of the tree had his birth year correct in the tree.

A second error involved a marriage to his wife, correctly identified in this online tree. Children born to the couple were also correctly identified with birth years beginning in 1801. But the tree owner linked to a marriage in 1832 stating this was for the man and his wife. Not only is that impossible given the birth years of their children but a quick click on the link showed the marriage to be in a different state and for a man with the same name but marrying an entirely different wife!

And so  I vented, expressing my dismay at the public posting of a tree so obviously incorrect. And the fact that at least six other researchers had copied the mistakes and posted them to their own public trees.

My rant, to my surprise, generated a heated discussion! It's been very interesting and some excellent ideas and suggestions were given for combating these types of errors without becoming the genealogy police.

It's tricky to critique another person's tree. Most of us don't take kindly to being told we're wrong. And it doesn't seem to matter how gently or kindly you express it, the bottom line is - you're telling someone they goofed.

Most of us agreed that the best method is to instruct through online tutorials, webinars, video how tos, to be come a mentor and to lead by example.  I often write  articles that I hope will guide those new to genealogy and help them become better genealogists.  You can find some of these on Olive Tree Genealogy blog under the topic heading TUTORIALS in the right side nav bar.  And there's an abundance of material out there to allow all of us, from the beginner to the experienced, to learn something new.

What's your opinion? 

Credit: Image from Fotolia

May 16, 2012

A Photograph Brings Life to an Ancestor

Jack Schulze with parents
Recently my youngest son was given a photo of his grandfather Jack with Jack's parents.  That doesn't sound too exciting but it is. No one in the family knew much about Jack's parents. All we knew was that Jack's father was either Otto or Oscar Schulze and his mom was Harriet.

Years ago I asked my son's father to ask his mother about the Schulze family. Since she divorced Jack in the 50's we weren't sure how accurate or even truthful her answers would be, but it was better than nothing. Jack was long dead and there was no one else to ask. All she could remember was the surname Dewhurst and she wasn't sure if that was Harriet or someone else.

So my hunt began. We knew the family was from Germany originally but settled in Yorkshire England at some point. Searching the online records wasn't as simple as I thought it would be and I couldn't be sure if I had the right man since we weren't even sure if his name was Otto Oscar or Oscar Otto. The family lore was that Jack, whose name was Jack Otto, had been given the middle name Otto after his father's first name. And that this was a tradition in the family so if Jack's father's middle name was Oscar, that meant the next generation back was a man named Oscar (something) Schulze.

Then I remembered a small stationary box that my father-in-law Jack had in his possession when he died.  We'd put it in the attic and of course forgot all about it.  Inside I found the death certificate for his father. Question One answered  - his father's name was Oscar Otto Schulze and he died in 1942 at the age of 58. Armed with an approximate birth year I was able to trace Oscar and find his parents, as well as his marriage to Harriet Dewhirst in 1908.

We've never connected with any other researchers. Oscar and Harriet had only one child - my father-in-law Jack.  Oscar was one of nine siblings born to Henry George Schulze and his wife Mary, but I haven't found anyone else descended from any of them. So it was a thrill for my son to be given this photograph which shows Oscar Otto Schulze (1884-1942) and Harriet Dewhirst (1887-?) The families lived in Halifax, Yorkshire England and my next quest is to hopefully find Harriet's death and send for her certificate.

Slowly but surely we are putting together my son's paternal lineage for him and his children. Since his father died when my son was only 13, this is a very meaningful journey. And this photo brings his ancestors closer, giving a face to what was just a name and a few dates.

May 15, 2012

Lost & Found: Arthur Fitzgerald's WW1 ID Tag

WW1 ID Tag Canadian Soldier
This is another Tribute  for a Canadian soldier.  His name and service number are given on the front of his WW1 ID Tag - A. Fitzgerald, Service Number 55422.

This tag is made of aluminum and we know it was issued early in the War. Aluminum was expensive and at some point tags were made out of a pressed material which was between paper and cardboard in feel.

We do not know the meaning of the two letters at the bottom - E. C./G.




Back of WW1 ID Tag
The reverse of this tag shows the soldier's unit (19 Batt. Inf. which stands for 19th Infantry Battalion) and at the bottom the word Canadian is stamped. This designated which country a soldier's unit was in.

Who was A. Fitzgerald? Did he survive the War? Our curiousity was piqued and research begun.

First stop was the online CEF database. Using the service or regimental number provided on the tag, we found the Attestation papers for Arthur Fitzgerald born in Eastbourne, Sussex England on 12 November 1891.

His mother is listed as Lady A. Fitzgerald of Kilkea Castle, Mageney, Co. Kildare Ireland. He works in the Telegraph Office of the CPR (Canadian Pacific Railway)

Interestingly Arthur enlisted in 1914 on his 23rd birthday. I next went to Ancestry.com to search census records and ships passenger lists. I was curious when Arthur came to Canada. Unfortunately nothing conclusive turned up in either set of records.

I did find one marriage record which might be Arthur's. The marriage took place in Toronto in September 1919 between Arthur Maurice Fitzgerald born England, age 28 and Berna Wilhelmina Guest.  Arthur is named as the son of Charles John Oswald Fitzgerald and Alice Fitzgerald. 


There are several online family trees which indicate this is indeed the correct Arthur whose WW1 ID Tag we have. One tree shows Arthur as dying in Toronto in 1968.  


Arthur's father is listed as Col Sir Charles John FitzGerald Birth 8 JUN 1840 in East Indies Death 28 Feb 1912 in Eastbourne, Sussex, England. Sir Charles married Lady Alice Fitzgerald in 1882. Lady Alice's information is given as Birth 12 DEC 1853 in Kilkea Castle, Kildare Death 16 DEC 1941

Lady Alice was the daughter of a Marquis, Charles Fitzgerald. I have no other information on Arthur.



May 14, 2012

Who Do You Think You Are? Cancelled

 Season 3 of Who Do You Think You Are? sponsored by Ancestry.com will be the last Season. NBC announced that it has cancelled the popular genealogy show for next year.

I'll miss the show but it had a good run! Considering the small niche market I think the decision to not run another season was understandable. 

Read the Press Announcement from Ancestry.com

May 13, 2012

Sharing Memories (Week 20): Friday Night Cards!

Welcome to Week 20 of our 52 weeks of Sharing Memories - A Genealogy Journey for 2012. This is our third year writing our memoirs and childhood memories for our descendants.

If you are just joining us, you can take a peek at the last two years' of prompts by clicking on the Sharing Memories tab at the top of the blog. You can jump in at any time and you can skip topics that you don't like. There are no rules, it's all about getting your memories down on paper. The prompts are here as a guide to help if you are stuck for ideas.

Share your memories here in the comment section, on your own blog, or privately in a journal you keep at home.

I was telling my husband about playing cards when I was a kid. We played cards quite a bit and I was considered a whiz at Concentration. Sure wish I had that kind of steel-trap memory now!

My Grandmother McGinnis loved to play Gin Rummy so when she visited, my dad, me and  my grandma would play. She almost always won and would slap her cards down with a chuckle as she called out "Gin!"

When I was a young teenager my brother and his wife used to play cards with us every Friday night. I loved those evenings of sitting around with chips and coke (never anything different!) and having a few laughs. I can't remember what card games we played but I suspect it was Hearts or Old Maid. At midnight my sister-in-law would make toasted salmon sandwiches for us all. How I miss those Friday nights and those sandwiches!

What kinds of games did you play as a family group? Do you miss them? Have you carried the traditions on to your own children and grandchildren?

May 12, 2012

Last Day of Special Offers from Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner does it again with twelve (12!) days of specials for National Scrapbooking Day and Mother’s Day.  If you haven't read how much I love my Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the different ways I use it, please take a minute to read my Flp-Pal Stories

This is such a versatile little scanner. I use mine when I visit my elderly auntie, so I can scan photos while we chat. I also like to sit on the couch watching t.v. while scanning my family photos.

Here is the list of each day's Specials to May 12.  Just use the links provided and enter the promotion code when you checkout.  This is the last day of offers.

All promotion codes are active 12:00 a.m.–11:59 p.m. MDT (-6 GMT) on their
respective dates. All items must be in the shopping cart prior to using the promotion code.

To get your special deal use this link Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the Promotion Code given for each day  

Saturday, May 12. Use Promotion Code: md512

Save $40 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Digital Creativity Suite 3.0 DVD when you also purchase all of the following items:

• A Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 4 items must be in your shopping cart.)

Inside History Magazine and Top 50 Genealogy Blog List

A fellow blogger, Amy Coffin of WeTree Blog, wrote an article about her blog being included in Australia's Inside History Magazine's top 50 genealogy blogs. I went to Amy's blog to congratulate her, then headed off to see what other blogs made it to the list. I'm always looking for new genealogy blogs to follow.

Jill Ball, another fellow blogger whom I met at RootsTech 2010 wrote the article called "Entering the Blogosphere" which lists 50 top genealogy blogs organized by topic. 


I did discover some blogs listed that I wasn't familiar with, so that was great. But much to my surprise, I also found my own Olive Tree Genealogy blog listed in the Top 50! I'm in the category of "must reads from overseas" That makes sense since the magazine is Australian based. So thank you to Jill and Inside History Magazine for this honour! I'm thrilled to be included in such good company and especially pleased since Australia has a special meaning for me. 


My 2nd great grandmother Sarah Stead, nee Elvery headed to Australia from England to settle with her husband and four young children in 1867. Sadly the pregnant Sarah delivered her baby on board the ship and then died a few weeks later in quarantine in Sydney Harbour. She was only 32 years old. She's buried in the old Rookwood Cemetery in Sydney and the gravedigger was her husband's brother who lived in Sunny Corners. 

Sarah's husband William Stead left two of his children behind with his brother and sailed back to England with the other two (the baby died at 9 months old and is also buried in Australia). One of the children he brought back to England was my great-grandmother.  In fact I wrote a 5-part blog series called Abandoned in Australia chronicling my journey to find out what happened to the two boys left behind, and what happened to Sarah and her baby.  


I also have many Simpson and Stead relatives in Australia, since my grandmother's brother and uncles settled there in the late 1800s. So you can see I have a strong emotional attachment to Australia. And being placed in the Top 50 Genealogy blogs means a lot to me.

May 11, 2012

Announcement: 1911 England Census FREE May 11-14

The following announcement was sent to Olive Tree Genealogy Blog and I'm off to take advantage of this offer. Hoping I can find my English grandmother.

The 1911 Census is complete at Ancestry.co.uk. They've finished all the transcriptions, so you can search for your relatives just as you would in any of their other census records. Better yet, they've made the whole thing absolutely FREE 11-14th May!

This is perhaps the most detailed family history collection available anywhere online. It includes over 25 million records, with a separate page dedicated to each household. You can see each entry in your ancestors' original handwriting, and look for any extra notes they made. Some helpful souls even added potted histories of their movements or occupations. See a 1911 Census record

You'll also find extra columns not included on previous censuses. You can discover the industries people worked in, how long couples had been married, and how many children they'd had. This last point is particularly useful if you've found birth records that don't seem to tally with your existing discoveries.

To help you pick out every last detail, Ancestry.co.uk have created an exclusive record viewer, especially for the 1911 Census. This viewer makes it much easier to spot the ancestors you've searched for. Plus, move your cursor along their entries, and you'll be given an expert analysis of what each column is telling you ? and a transcription of any difficult handwriting. Read more about the census viewer

1911 marked the end of an era, with the Industrial Revolution complete and World War I just three years away. The Census reveals whether your ancestors kept to tradition as butlers and maids, embraced change as miners or factory workers; or fought the system as suffragettes.

This is the perfect chance to discover your recent relatives. Log in to Ancestry.co.uk  to search the entire England & Wales 1911 Census for FREE.

Search the 1911 Census now.

Day 11 Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner Special Offers

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner does it again with twelve (12!) days of specials for National Scrapbooking Day and Mother’s Day.  If you haven't read how much I love my Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the different ways I use it, please take a minute to read my Flp-Pal Stories

This is such a versatile little scanner. I use mine when I visit my elderly auntie, so I can scan photos while we chat. I also like to sit on the couch watching t.v. while scanning my family photos.

Here is the list of each day's Specials to May 12.  Just use the links provided and enter the promotion code when you checkout.  I can't wait until May 9th special!  I don't have all the extra goodies for my scanner and that will be my chance to save some money.

All promotion codes are active 12:00 a.m.–11:59 p.m. MDT (-6 GMT) on their
respective dates. All items must be in the shopping cart prior to using the promotion code.

To get your special deal use this link Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the Promotion Code given for each day  

Friday, May 11. Use Promotion Code: md511

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Creative Suite Craft Edition DVD and get a Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket FREE! (Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Saturday, May 12. Use Promotion Code: md512

Save $40 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Digital Creativity Suite 3.0 DVD when you also purchase all of the following items:

• A Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket

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• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 4 items must be in your shopping cart.)

Family Heirloom: Brass Racing Dogs Find a New Home

Brass Racing Dogs
Recently my son reconnected with an aunt on his father's side.  Since his father passed away in 1993 there has been little contact with that side of the family.  There was no estrangement it was simply due to time constraints and distance.

When my son visited his aunt last weekend he had a chance to reconnect with cousins, and his aunt kindly showed him family photos and told him stories of his ancestors.

She also gave him a beautiful gift of two brass racing dogs which were owned by Roland Hill, my son's great-grandfather. Roland was born in 1880 in Pontefract, Yorkshire England and died in 1943 in Halifax Yorkshire England. He apparently loved birds and owned many canaries which he kept in cages in the attic of his home.  My son's aunt remembers her grandfather fondly and has told me many stories about him over the years.

The two greyhound racing dogs sat in front of the fireplace for as long as my son's aunt can remember. Perhaps they were a wedding present at his marriage to Kate Wormald in 1905.

The dogs have names stamped on their bases. One is Col. North's Fullerton and the other is Farndon Ferry. A Google search provided information that they were the winners of the famous Waterloo Cup,  at the end of the 19th century. Fullerton, known as Col. North's Fullerton at the height of his success, won between 1889 and 1892. Farndon Ferry won the event in 1902.

My son's aunt wanted him to have these brass fireplace dogs so that he could pass them on to one of his children (along with the story of who first owned them). And that is what I love about genealogy and family who care about family treasures.  The dogs are on a new journey.


May 10, 2012

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner 10th Day of Specials!

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner does it again with twelve (12!) days of specials for National Scrapbooking Day and Mother’s Day.  If you haven't read how much I love my Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the different ways I use it, please take a minute to read my Flp-Pal Stories

This is such a versatile little scanner. I use mine when I visit my elderly auntie, so I can scan photos while we chat. I also like to sit on the couch watching t.v. while scanning my family photos.

Here is the list of each day's Specials to May 12.  Just use the links provided and enter the promotion code when you checkout.  I can't wait until May 9th special!  I don't have all the extra goodies for my scanner and that will be my chance to save some money.

All promotion codes are active 12:00 a.m.–11:59 p.m. MDT (-6 GMT) on their
respective dates. All items must be in the shopping cart prior to using the promotion code.

To get your special deal use this link Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the Promotion Code given for each day  

Thursday, May 10. Use Promotion Code: md510

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and receive a grey Flip-Pal Carry Case FREE! (Please note: this is the neoprene, not deluxe carry case. Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Friday, May 11. Use Promotion Code: md511

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Creative Suite Craft Edition DVD and get a Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket FREE! (Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Saturday, May 12. Use Promotion Code: md512

Save $40 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Digital Creativity Suite 3.0 DVD when you also purchase all of the following items:

• A Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 4 items must be in your shopping cart.)

May 9, 2012

6 Indexed States for 1940 U.S. Census Now Available!

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (May 9, 2012)The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project announced today the availability of a free, searchable index of 1940 U.S. census records for six U.S. states, including Delaware, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon, Virginia and New Hampshire. Records for these states are now searchable by name, location and family relations thanks to the efforts of more than 100,000 volunteers nationwide.

“For the past month, Community Project partners have worked to establish the first free, searchable database of 1940 U.S. census records made possible entirely through the hard work of volunteers,” said Josh Taylor, spokesperson for the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. “We’re proud to bring easily searchable 1940 U.S. census records for Delaware, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon, Virginia and New Hampshire online for people to learn about their ancestors and life and times in these states more than 72 years ago.”

Since April 2, Community Project volunteers have indexed more than 45 million records and this number continues to grow quickly as more than 10,000 volunteers sign up each week. Those interested in lending a hand can learn more and sign up to be an official 1940 U.S. census volunteer indexer at the 1940 census website (the1940census.com). The project will release searchable records for individual states on an ongoing basis with an aim to make the entire 1940 U.S. census searchable by the end of 2012.

The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project is a joint initiative between the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, findmypast.com, ProQuest and other leading genealogy organizations. Thanks to advancements in technology and to volunteers nationwide, Project partners and volunteers can lend a voice to countless untold stories of their ancestors living, working and persevering as the “Greatest Generation.”

“When you index U.S. census records, what you’re essentially doing is stepping back in time and walking in the shoes of the enumerator some 72 years prior,” said Megan Smolenyak, spokesperson for the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. “The indexing experience is much like walking down a street, ringing doorbells and learning about a specific neighborhood in 1940. Only now, volunteers can explore these fascinating records from the comfort of our own homes.”

To learn more about the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project and to track real-time progress of volunteer indexing efforts, visit the1940census.com.

Day 9 Special Deals Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner does it again with twelve (12!) days of specials for National Scrapbooking Day and Mother’s Day.  If you haven't read how much I love my Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the different ways I use it, please take a minute to read my Flp-Pal Stories

This is such a versatile little scanner. I use mine when I visit my elderly auntie, so I can scan photos while we chat. I also like to sit on the couch watching t.v. while scanning my family photos.

Here is the list of each day's Specials to May 12.  Just use the links provided and enter the promotion code when you checkout.  I can't wait until May 9th special!  I don't have all the extra goodies for my scanner and that will be my chance to save some money.

All promotion codes are active 12:00 a.m.–11:59 p.m. MDT (-6 GMT) on their
respective dates. All items must be in the shopping cart prior to using the promotion code.

To get your special deal use this link Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the Promotion Code given for each day  

Wednesday, May 9. Use Promotion Code: md509

Save $10 Save when you purchase all of the following Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner accessories:

• Flip-Pal Window Protector Sheets 3-PK

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 3 items must be in your shopping cart.)

Thursday, May 10. Use Promotion Code: md510

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and receive a grey Flip-Pal Carry Case FREE! (Please note: this is the neoprene, not deluxe carry case. Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Friday, May 11. Use Promotion Code: md511

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Creative Suite Craft Edition DVD and get a Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket FREE! (Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Saturday, May 12. Use Promotion Code: md512

Save $40 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Digital Creativity Suite 3.0 DVD when you also purchase all of the following items:

• A Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 4 items must be in your shopping cart.)

May 8, 2012

Tribute to Ira Harry Huehn WW1 Soldier in PPCLI

Ira Harry Huehn was born 10 June 1895 in Toronto. He enlisted in the CEF (Canadian Expeditionary Force) on August 15, 1915 when he was just 20 years old.

He gave his mother, Mrs. H. E. Huehn as his next-of-kin. He was a bank clerk and had served 3 months with the Queen's Own Rifles before enlisting.

Ira was sent to the PPCLI (Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry) which co-incidentally is the unit my youngest son served in as an infantry soldier from 2000-2005.

Sadly Ira was killed in action at Sanctuary Wood less than a year after he went to war. His death is recorded as 4 June 1916

A search of Ancestry revealed that Ira's parents were Henry and Minnie and that he had older sisters Ethel and Lydia



photo found by Annette F.
We have Ira's Death Medal, Silver Cross (see photo on left) and WW1 Medal.
Ira's father died in October 1914 and his poor mother lost her husband and only son in a two year span. 

This blog post is meant as a tribute to Ira and all those who fight and have fought for our country.

Ira Huehn's Death Medal

Ira Huehn's WW1 Medal - front

Ira Huehn's WW1 Medal - back

Canada, CEF Burial Registers, First World War, 1914-1919 

Sadly Ira's body was never recovered for burial. I often think of how his mother and sisters must have grieved, not only for the loss of Ira but thinking of how he was never laid to rest.


Day 8 Special Offers Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner does it again with twelve (12!) days of specials for National Scrapbooking Day and Mother’s Day.  If you haven't read how much I love my Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the different ways I use it, please take a minute to read my Flp-Pal Stories

This is such a versatile little scanner. I use mine when I visit my elderly auntie, so I can scan photos while we chat. I also like to sit on the couch watching t.v. while scanning my family photos.

Here is the list of each day's Specials to May 12.  Just use the links provided and enter the promotion code when you checkout.  I can't wait until May 9th special!  I don't have all the extra goodies for my scanner and that will be my chance to save some money.

All promotion codes are active 12:00 a.m.–11:59 p.m. MDT (-6 GMT) on their
respective dates. All items must be in the shopping cart prior to using the promotion code.

To get your special deal use this link Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the Promotion Code given for each day  

Tuesday, May 8. Use Promotion Code: md508

Save $20 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Creative Suite Craft Edition

Wednesday, May 9. Use Promotion Code: md509

Save $10 Save when you purchase all of the following Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner accessories:

• Flip-Pal Window Protector Sheets 3-PK

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 3 items must be in your shopping cart.)

Thursday, May 10. Use Promotion Code: md510

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and receive a grey Flip-Pal Carry Case FREE! (Please note: this is the neoprene, not deluxe carry case. Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Friday, May 11. Use Promotion Code: md511

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Creative Suite Craft Edition DVD and get a Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket FREE! (Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Saturday, May 12. Use Promotion Code: md512

Save $40 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Digital Creativity Suite 3.0 DVD when you also purchase all of the following items:

• A Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 4 items must be in your shopping cart.)

May 7, 2012

Determining the Accuracy of Census and Other Genealogy Records

Mariann asked Olive Tree Genealogy a great question about the accuracy of ages on census records.
Do genealogists often find a lot of  inaccurate ages (and projected birth years) on the US Census? I've been using ancestry.com, and relatives often seem to vary their stated ages (thus birth years) from one census to another. Then when I see a Death Certificate, the stated birth year sometimes doesn't agree with any of the census dates. There can be a variation of as many as 5 or 6 years. How do I know which date is the closest to accurate?
Mariann, 

This is a really important question. As you research ancestors you will often find large discrepancies in ages from one census to the next. There are several reasons for this:

1. People often did not know exactly when they were born. There were no ID cards, credit cards, Driver's Licenses and so on in the 1800s and earlier. These are all items that require an exact date of birth and so it is imperative that we know when we were born. But before the 20th century it was not important. In fact I have a copy of a letter written in 1841 by my 2nd great grandfather Levi Peer asking his mother to check her Family Bible and tell him when he was born.

2. We do not know who provided the answers to the census taker's questions. Was it the head of house? Was it a spouse? Was it an older child or a neighbour? Not knowing if it was the individual giving the answers means we do not know how accurate the information is

3. Different census years had different questions re ages. For example the question on age might be phrased as "Age at last birthday" or "Age at next birthday"  or simply "Age" And of course the census taker might not ask the question as specified.  Of course that won't give a 5 or 6 year variation in answers but it does account for some.

4. Women in particular often lied about their ages. Many individuals didn't trust the census or the census taker and would simply give whatever answer they felt like giving.

So there you have four reasons why census ages can't be trusted. You mention Death Certificates not agreeing with census records and that's another problematic record. A Death Certificate has information that was not provided by the deceased! So depending on who the informant was and how much they knew about the deceased, the information provided can be completely inaccurate.

I have a good example of a Death Certificate that is completely wrong but will, I'm sure, be accepted as accurate by researchers. My grandmother's 17 year old brother was the informant for their mother Mary Peer's death. He has given the wrong mother and father for his mother. Her parents were Isaac Vollick and Lydia Jamieson (this is proven with  documents such as her marriage record and census records). But he has said her parents were Stephen Vollick and Mary. Such a discrepancy took me awhile to solve.

Then I realized that in all likelihood, in his grief and confusion when the clerk asked him "Father's name" he gave his own father's name (Stephen). When asked "Mother's name" he gave his mother's name - Mary. Thus the entirely fictitious couple Stephen and Mary Vollick were created. Researchers finding that death certificate who have not yet found Mary's marriage record will have no idea that they are looking at completely erroneous information.

The bottom line is that it is wise to study all records and determine their validity by looking at who gave the information contained in each record. 

So for example a death record or a gravestone for example may not be accurate because the person themselves did not provide the information.

A birth record is considered quite accurate because the information is usually given by parents. But there's a caveat - if you are not looking at the original record there is a chance that errors crept in. Each generation of a record increases the chance of errors. You may want to read my article I Found My Great-Grandfather Online - Now What?? for more information on how much an original record can change.

Just to make things more confusing, remember that individuals might lie for various reasons. That is why we should always gather as many records as possible for each individual. Calculate the trustworthiness of each one. Then study them as a group. Sometimes you have to be content with an estimated year for an event based on all the records you've found.

But of course you should keep looking for a record that will give a first-person account of the event. In any record you should think about who provided the information. If it was not the individual then the accuracy is immediately in question. And even if it was the individual, did they know the answer? Did they lie?

Genealogy research is never easy but analyzing records is part of the fun!

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner Day 7 Special Deals

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner does it again with twelve (12!) days of specials for National Scrapbooking Day and Mother’s Day.  If you haven't read how much I love my Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the different ways I use it, please take a minute to read my Flp-Pal Stories

This is such a versatile little scanner. I use mine when I visit my elderly auntie, so I can scan photos while we chat. I also like to sit on the couch watching t.v. while scanning my family photos.

Here is the list of each day's Specials to May 12.  Just use the links provided and enter the promotion code when you checkout.  I can't wait until May 9th special!  I don't have all the extra goodies for my scanner and that will be my chance to save some money.

All promotion codes are active 12:00 a.m.–11:59 p.m. MDT (-6 GMT) on their
respective dates. All items must be in the shopping cart prior to using the promotion code.

To get your special deal use this link Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the Promotion Code given for each day  

Monday, May 7. Use Promotion Code: md507

Save $30 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner when you also purchase all of the following items:

• A Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 4 items—including the scanner—must be in your shopping cart.)

Tuesday, May 8. Use Promotion Code: md508

Save $20 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Creative Suite Craft Edition

Wednesday, May 9. Use Promotion Code: md509

Save $10 Save when you purchase all of the following Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner accessories:

• Flip-Pal Window Protector Sheets 3-PK

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 3 items must be in your shopping cart.)

Thursday, May 10. Use Promotion Code: md510

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and receive a grey Flip-Pal Carry Case FREE! (Please note: this is the neoprene, not deluxe carry case. Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Friday, May 11. Use Promotion Code: md511

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Creative Suite Craft Edition DVD and get a Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket FREE! (Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Saturday, May 12. Use Promotion Code: md512

Save $40 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Digital Creativity Suite 3.0 DVD when you also purchase all of the following items:

• A Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 4 items must be in your shopping cart.)

May 6, 2012

Day 6 Genealogy Specials at Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner does it again with twelve (12!) days of specials for National Scrapbooking Day and Mother’s Day.  If you haven't read how much I love my Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the different ways I use it, please take a minute to read my Flp-Pal Stories

This is such a versatile little scanner. I use mine when I visit my elderly auntie, so I can scan photos while we chat. I also like to sit on the couch watching t.v. while scanning my family photos.

Here is the list of each day's Specials to May 12.  Just use the links provided and enter the promotion code when you checkout.  I can't wait until May 9th special!  I don't have all the extra goodies for my scanner and that will be my chance to save some money.

All promotion codes are active 12:00 a.m.–11:59 p.m. MDT (-6 GMT) on their
respective dates. All items must be in the shopping cart prior to using the promotion code.

To get your special deal use this link Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and the Promotion Code given for each day  

Sunday, May 6. Use Promotion Code: md506

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Digital Creativity Suite 3.0 DVD and get a Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket FREE! (Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Monday, May 7. Use Promotion Code: md507

Save $30 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner when you also purchase all of the following items:

• A Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 4 items—including the scanner—must be in your shopping cart.)

Tuesday, May 8. Use Promotion Code: md508

Save $20 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Creative Suite Craft Edition

Wednesday, May 9. Use Promotion Code: md509

Save $10 Save when you purchase all of the following Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner accessories:

• Flip-Pal Window Protector Sheets 3-PK

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 3 items must be in your shopping cart.)

Thursday, May 10. Use Promotion Code: md510

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and receive a grey Flip-Pal Carry Case FREE! (Please note: this is the neoprene, not deluxe carry case. Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Friday, May 11. Use Promotion Code: md511

Purchase a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Creative Suite Craft Edition DVD and get a Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket FREE! (Both items must be in your shopping cart.)

Saturday, May 12. Use Promotion Code: md512

Save $40 on the purchase of a Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner with Digital Creativity Suite 3.0 DVD when you also purchase all of the following items:

• A Deluxe Flip-Pal mobile scanner Carry Case with Pocket

• A Flip-Pal mobile scanner Sketch Kit

• An Eneloop AA 4 Pack with AC Charger

(All 4 items must be in your shopping cart.)

Sharing Memories (Week 19): New Friends

Welcome to Week 19 of our 52 weeks of Sharing Memories - A Genealogy Journey for 2012. This is our third year writing our memoirs and childhood memories for our descendants.

If you are just joining us, you can take a peek at the last two years' of prompts by clicking on the Sharing Memories tab at the top of the blog. You can jump in at any time and you can skip topics that you don't like. There are no rules, it's all about getting your memories down on paper. The prompts are here as a guide to help if you are stuck for ideas.

Share your memories here in the comment section, on your own blog, or privately in a journal you keep at home.

This week I've been thinking a lot about mixing with the kids from the new area of our town. In last week's Sharing Memories post I talked about how we were separated both financially and geographically by the East-West main highway and the railway tracks. Each area had its own schools from Kindergarten to Grade 6. Once we hit Grade 7 we were thrown together in a school in the new area for the next two years. Then High School from Grade 9 to 13. It was also in the new area. So we kids from the old area were always thrown into home team territory!

Once in High School we were separated by marks and perceived academic abilities. I was put into 9A (yes even back then I was a geek) with kids I'd only known since Grade 7. And I only knew them to mumble "hi" as we passed in the hall or entered a classroom at the same time. There was only one other person in the same class as me but thankfully it was my best friend Janie!

Everyone else that I knew was in 9B and 9C and I very quickly learned that not only did new area and old area kids not mix, 9A did not mix with anyone in a lower class (so 9B and 9C etc were off limits)

To top it off I was extremely shy and withdrawn back then. Oh how I've changed! But Grade 9 was a difficult year for me and to add to the challenges, my older siblings had gone to a different High School since mine was brand new. So no one knew our family.

Added to those drawbacks I had what I considered a major one. I didn't have the same clothes as the other girls so I never felt like I fit in. They had the latest styles in skirts, shoes and sweaters while I only had two changes of clothes. I had two skirts that my mother made out of gingham window curtains. One was blue and white, the other was pink and white. I wore a white button down blouse (I had two identical ones) with those skirts. And that was it. I felt like such a loser. Then my dad died that Christmas.  Let's just say it was a rough year.

But much to my surprise I made lots of friends from the new area. By the time Grade 9 was over I had a large social group of girlfriends and other than never being invited to their homes, I was content. They came to my house for sleepovers and fun, but only once from Grade 9 to 13 was I invited to one of their homes. That's another blog post though.

All in all by the time Grade 9 ended I was pretty happy. I had friends. I was never teased or bullied even though I fit the criteria for being a victim. Grade 10 continued with me gradually coming out of my shell and making even more friends. I wanted to participate in extra-curricular activities but my mother arranged for me to work at our local library every day after school so I was out of luck.

I did however manage to join and stay in the band and in choir even though I had to miss many practices. I've often wondered if the band leader and choirmaster felt sorry for me and didn't have the heart to boot me out. They were pretty decent and understanding about my not making practice unless it was on a night when I didn't have to work. In an odd twist of luck I was actually chosen to be in a triple trio (anyone else remember those??) that won all kinds of competitions so I got to travel all around Ontario singing in those various events. Lucky me to be in with a group of 8 other talented singers (from the new area of course) who could cover for my inadequacies!

And so a few of us from the old area did mingle to a degree with kids from the new area. I'm still not sure what the criteria was for being included because not many of us were. And I'm not sure we ever really felt like we were completely accepted. But I was overjoyed to have new friends and we had some great times getting together at my house. We were always having sleepovers at my place and getting into all kinds of new adventures. Sometimes the other mothers weren't very pleased at what they considered my mother's lack of supervision but boy we had fun!